1. Salvage by Alexandra Duncan
From Goodreads:
Ava, a teenage girl living aboard the male-dominated deep space merchant ship Parastrata, faces betrayal, banishment, and death. Taking her fate into her own hands, she flees to the Gyre, a floating continent of garbage and scrap in the Pacific Ocean, in this thrilling, surprising, and thought-provoking debut novel that will appeal to fans of Across the Universe, by Beth Revis, and The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood.

After reading a sample of this book, it reads to me like many literary-based science fiction novels (think FEED by MT Anderson or BLOOD RED ROAD by Moira Young). It’s been described as literary, descriptive, and “super feminist.” I haven’t read it in full yet, but I intend to.
    High Res

    Salvage by Alexandra Duncan

    From Goodreads:

    Ava, a teenage girl living aboard the male-dominated deep space merchant ship Parastrata, faces betrayal, banishment, and death. Taking her fate into her own hands, she flees to the Gyre, a floating continent of garbage and scrap in the Pacific Ocean, in this thrilling, surprising, and thought-provoking debut novel that will appeal to fans of Across the Universe, by Beth Revis, and The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood.

    After reading a sample of this book, it reads to me like many literary-based science fiction novels (think FEED by MT Anderson or BLOOD RED ROAD by Moira Young). It’s been described as literary, descriptive, and “super feminist.” I haven’t read it in full yet, but I intend to.

  2. meltedthedashboard:

    HEY, ARE YOU AN ACADEMIC, STUDENT, OR PERSON INTERESTED IN LITERATURE (PARTICULARLY FOR TEENAGE GIRLS?)

    HAVE YOU EVER WRITTEN OR READ A THING ON THE INTERNET WHICH EXPRESSES SAID THOUGHTS?

    WOULD YOU LIKE TO HELP A GIRL OUT?

    I’m writing my diss on YA Literature this summer and whilst there’s loads of great academic journals and out there, me and my supervisor both think that it’s really important that I include the organic stuff that grows out of tumblr and blogging culture. Which is a big headache in terms of credibility but will (hopefully) be worth it because I know there’s some brilliant stuff out there.

    Basically, if anybody out there has had a particular blog post, essay or even a tweet come to mind whilst reading this post who wants to send a link my way, that would be incredible. I really want to accurately represent the way that fandom/readership responds to texts and I don’t want to just cherry-pick things on my own; seeing as non-academic stuff isn’t published or particularly well-indexed, it’s so difficult to get a holistic view of things alone.

    Thanks!  

    I tend to write on this subject a lot, and most of my original posts on the topic can be found under my “original post” tag or on my long-form blog :)

  3. Defining Disability

    diversityinya:

    By Corinne Duyvis

    I am autistic.

    I remember vividly a time in art school when I mentioned this to a classmate. His immediate reaction: “Ha! I’ve seen autistic people. You’re seriously not autistic.”

    It didn’t matter to him that I’d had to drop out of high school the year before, at fourteen, after years of problems directly stemming from my autism. It didn’t matter that I had a diagnosis, or that I fit so many symptoms that my mom and I had laughed reading the list together. No. My classmate had witnessed me at school and deduced: Not Autistic. When he told me that, scoffing, I had to excuse myself to the bathroom and wait several minutes to stop shaking.

    Corinne Duyvis

    [Image: Corinne Duyvis]

    Other people have long accepted that I’m autistic—but that doesn’t mean they see it the same way I do. My grandmother has done this. Once, I casually mentioned something or other about being disabled, and she almost seemed to panic. “What? You’re not—you’re not disabled!” I gently tried to explain to her that, actually, I was declared unfit to work, and it significantly impacts my day-to-day life, so …

    “Yeah,” she said, “but you can walk!”

    I tried to explain it to her further, but she was deeply uncomfortable with the topic, and quickly dismissed it.

    Disability can be visible or invisible, debilitating or casual, and it’s impossible to define Once and For All. Definitions inevitably exclude people who want to be included. The opposite also holds true. Sometimes, you’re including people who don’t want to be. Some autistic and Deaf people don’t consider themselves disabled, simply different. Some elderly people who struggle to walk or hear don’t see that as a disability, but simply as a part of getting older. Some chronically or terminally ill people reject being called disabled, as well. Other people don’t consider themselves “disabled enough” to use the term.

    Complex discussions regularly take place within the disability community about identity. These discussions deal with topics such as identity policing, internalized ablism, negative associations, appropriation, transablism, and much more. However important these discussions are, my advice to most people is: don’t define or police anyone’s disability status. It’s not the place or business of people who are not a part of the disability community.

    Sometimes, however, we’re faced with the need to define disability for pragmatic reasons. For Malinda, it came up when she was looking at the representation of disabled main characters in the Best Fiction for Young Adults lists. For me, it comes up when moderating Disability in Kidlit. Which characters count? Who can contribute? Which conditions do we want to discuss?

    When starting Disability in Kidlit, my co-moderator Kody Keplinger and I chose to include all the “obvious” disabilities, but also anything from mental illness to learning disorders to chronic conditions, which people with and without said conditions sometimes argue don’t “count.” We both know people with the above conditions who do identify as disabled, and they often suffer from exactly the kinds of erasure, misrepresentations, tropes, and stereotypes that we want to discuss and dismantle at Disability in Kidlit. A lot of hurt can come from defining people’s disabilities for them—particularly when it comes to conditions that are often excluded as it is. The broader we draw the line, the less chance of that happening.

    That doesn’t make the decisions about which books to include on our lists clear-cut. Sometimes it’s easy to exclude a book, for instance when a character has a temporary injury. Other times, it’s trickier. After all, disability is not only defined by a character’s mental or physical condition, but also by society and circumstances.

    Take a character who is legally blind, but wears glasses that correct her vision perfectly. She only notices her bad vision when she has to take off her glasses for bed. She probably doesn’t identify as disabled, because despite the need for assistive equipment, her vision causes minimal changes or discrimination in her daily life.

    Now put this same woman in an apocalyptic world and smash her glasses. Write her into a fantastical or historical setting where they haven’t developed corrective lenses yet. All of a sudden, she’s blind. She’s disabled. Same character, same disability, different conditions.

    What about people with ADD? People may qualify this condition as an issue, a quirk, a developmental disorder—but not necessarily a disability. For me, when I’m in the store and spend ten minutes staring at different kinds of soap and want to cry because I’m incapable of making a decision, or when I’m so caught up in the maelstrom of ADD indecisiveness and autistic obsessiveness that I stay up until 4 a.m. for a week straight to research insurance options or signing pens, and I’m exhausted, and my mind goes on and on and on, and I know I’m wasting time, I’m skipping meals, missing deadlines, ignoring family, but I cannot stop … for me, it’s a disability.

    And depression—same thing. Many people with depression don’t identify as disabled. Many others do. What’s the difference? Does it depend on how long their condition lasts—a few months, a few years, a lifetime? Does it depend on how severely it impacts their day-to-day life? On how well their medication or coping mechanisms work for them? On their personal idea of disability, which for many people is a big, scary, and inherently negative concept?

    What about someone with a limp that prevents them from climbing or hiking, but never hurts and barely impacts them? (And what about if this person lives in a small mountain village in which climbing and hiking are essential?)

    What about a condition which rarely plays up, but is debilitating when it does? What about if someone lives in an idyllic, accessible, ablism-free society, where there is no difference between an inability to walk and an inability to drive? What about something seemingly minor—say, stiff fingers—but being a pianist is this person’s life’s work?

    In real life, whenever possible, we can ask whether someone identifies as disabled. In fiction, it’s different.

    There are no easy answers. Hopefully, this post addresses some of the complexities and helps people think about disability differently.

    * * *

    A lifelong Amsterdammer, Corinne Duyvis spends her days writing speculative MG and YA novels. She enjoys brutal martial arts and gets her geek on whenever possible. Her debut novel OTHERBOUND, a YA fantasy, is out from Amulet Books on June 17, 2014.

  4. World Book Night

    Happy World Book Night! Today, givers around the country (in both the US and the UK) will be giving out books to reluctant readers. I’m going to be giving my copies of CODE NAME VERITY out at a local continuation high school’s English department.

    This year, the organization has gone a step beyond and is offering a FREE ebook with stories from booksellers, librarians and authors, available for download at the link.

  5. Think about it this way:

    There’s a group of us. We’re either whispering quietly because we don’t want to upset anyone, or we’re just out of your sight so you can’t really hear us. And then, all of a sudden, somehow you hear us or someone leaves the group and tells you or someone voices their frustrations to you. And instead of listening, or providing them a space to boost that voice so people in other rooms will hear them, you walk back to their private room and start shouting. And people in other rooms hear you and they say ‘wow this is so great I’ve never thought of this before’ and they keep passing it on.

    But we’ve been having this conversation the entire time.

    I’m Still Here" by Sumayyah Daud (via yahighway)

    (via kdhart)

  6. Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.
    Joe Haldeman (via thegodawfulgatsby)

    (Source: maxkirin, via jadelyn)

  7. To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

    thejadedkiwano:

    Let’s play a game.

    Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

    you

    also

    what

    when

    why

    how

    look

    because

    never

    lol

    (via katethulhu)

  8. e-volt:

Congratulations Meg Medina! Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass is a commended title for the Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.
    High Res

    e-volt:

    Congratulations Meg Medina! Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass is a commended title for the Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature.

  9. paperbackd:

    Weekly YA Spotlight: A selection of the most anticipated new YA novels released this week (20/04 - 26/04)

    Prisoner of Night and Fog (Prisoner of Night and Fog #1) by Anne Blankman ✤ April 22nd

    The Year of the Rat by Clare Furniss ✤ April 24th

    The Inventor’s Secret (The Inventor’s Secret #1) by Andrea Cremer ✤ April 22nd

    Meridian (Arclight #2) by Josin L. McQuien ✤ April 22nd

    TALKER 25 (TALKER 25 #1) by Joshua McCune ✤ April 22nd

    The Chance You Won’t Return by Annie Cardi ✤ April 22nd

    Check out the rest of this month’s new YA releases here!

  10. catagator:

    pickeringtonlibrary:

    Some new books to add to your 2014 TBR piles…

    It’s still a great year for series, both new and ongoing, but if you’re in the mood for a story that begins and ends with one book, here are a few of the novels for (most of) the latter half of the year - ranging from science fiction and fantasy to paranormal to realistic contemporary - that have us intrigued. And of course they’re not the only ones on our radar - visit us on Goodreads to find many, many more! 

    Follow the links to find copies of available books in our catalog:

    Free to Fall, Lauren Miller

    Everything Leads to You, Nina Lacour

    Inland, Kat Rosenfield

    Say What You Will, Cammie McGovern

    Complicit, Stephanie Kuehn

    Conversion, Katherine Howe

    Fiendish, Brenna Yovanoff

    (Don’t You) Forget About Me, Kate Karyus Quinn

    Servants of the Storm, Delilah Dawson

    Beware the Wild, Natalie Parker

    Illusions of Fate, Kiersten White

    Belzhar, Meg Wolitzer

    Stitching Snow, R.C. Lewis

    Afterworlds, Scott Westerfeld

    Falling into Place, Amy Zhang

    Kiss of Broken Glass, Madeline Kuderick

    Bleed Like Me, Christa Desir

    This is a GREAT resource.