1. lorimlee:

laurendestefano:

bethrevis:

mikejung:

catagator:

Didn’t even get to close the search string before I was told I was wrong. 

This is appalling. What the hell, Google?

It’s not Google. Google just reflects what people search. It’s society that’s the problem. 

I didn’t believe this was real until I tried it myself just now. I even got the red squiggly.

WTFFFFFFF

-____________-
    High Res

    lorimlee:

    laurendestefano:

    bethrevis:

    mikejung:

    catagator:

    Didn’t even get to close the search string before I was told I was wrong. 

    This is appalling. What the hell, Google?

    It’s not Google. Google just reflects what people search. It’s society that’s the problem. 

    I didn’t believe this was real until I tried it myself just now. I even got the red squiggly.

    WTFFFFFFF

    -____________-

  2. What's your opinion on Eleanor & Park?

    justinaireland:

    elloellenoh:

    lisa-maxwell:

    elloellenoh:

    Ah, I’ve been wondering when I’d get this question. I admit that I’ve not been very vocal about my feelings on this book because as a fellow author, I don’t feel comfortable speaking negatively about another author’s book. But at the same time I have developed a growing angst over this subject and I will try to put it into words for you. When I first heard of the book, it was through friends who thought I’d be interested in the portrayal of a half-Korean boy. Of course I was! I bought it right away for my daughter. It sounded like a perfect teenage love story. I even recommended it to a friend of mine (non-Korean) who loved it. But then another friend of mine asked me if I had any problems with the depiction of Park and his mother and I hurriedly picked it up before my daughter could read it. Here’s the thing, it IS a lovely little teenage love story. But all I could keep thinking was, Damn it! Why did he have to be Korean? Why did this boy, who is so filled with self-loathing and contempt for his heritage, have to be Korean? Why did his mother with her sing songy broken English have to be Korean?

    And because of this, I ended up giving this book away to someone I felt would enjoy it better, a non-Korean. Because I didn’t want my daughter to read this and get that same icky feeling I did. That same humiliating sinking feeling you get when you realize you’ve stumbled across an awful stereotype of a Korean and you cringe that this is all that anyone takes away. And why oh why of all books that could possibly have a diverse main character did it have to be this one that hits the NYT list? Why did Rowell have to include the worst racist comment in the world in this book and think it is okay? Because when Eleanor thinks it, she also at least recognized it was racist. I’m sure that’s why she thought it was ok to include the most racist comment against Asians. But I flinched when I read it. I was so angry when I read it. I hated Eleanor after I read it and I never ever forgave her. No, Asians don’t see things smaller because our eyes are smaller. That is racist. It’s an interesting point to make that you can fall in love with a person of a different culture and still be racist. That’s ultimately Eleanor.

    But Park and his mother are more problematic. His mother is described as a chinadoll - a slur in itself. And Park just hates the fact that he doesn’t look more white like his brother. He is filled with self loathing to the point where he even says Asian men are not sexy. SAYS WHO?!! There was a period in my life when I was younger where I pushed away my culture and wished I wasn’t Korean. This was in direct correlation with the amount of racism I endured at the time. So I could understand Park, I could relate to him. But then I FOUND myself! I found my respect and love and pride for my culture. And I recognized just how important my Korean heritage was to me. Park never has that moment of self-discovery. And that is the greatest failure of this book. Because Rowell did not take the opportunity to really understand what it means to be multi-cultural. She wrote a character purely from a white person’s view, never thinking about how a minority person growing up in this country truly feels. The anguish of racism and the complexity of living between two different cultures was never explored. Instead, we are left to believe that Park goes through the rest of his life filled with contempt for his mother’s heritage. A person who wished he was white instead of Asian. And I find myself desperately wishing he’d been white too.

    A really interesting post. Yes to so many things—to the China Doll description, to the pain of seeing Park hate part of himself, but especially to the part where Oh never forgives Eleanor for using/thinking in slurs. I think that’s a really authentic—and necessary—response. It’s real—just like Eleanor is for having those thoughts. Because, let’s face it, lots of people who we may or may not ever think of as racist have these moments where horrible, terrible, hateful ideas creep in. Because what we grow up with is often hard to shake off, even when we want to.

    But I also think it’s ok to like Eleanor without ever forgiving her, because how many of us have people in our lives that we love, even though they say or believe hateful things? How many of the people we are or know have these deeply conflicting ideas about race and culture and what that all means? Life isn’t neat. Love isn’t neat. And sometime the people we love the most are also the people that we are most ashamed of.

    But I do take exception, a bit, when she says Rowell wrote without thinking about how a minority person growing up truly feels… It is absolutely true that it wasn’t explored in any depth. E&P certainly isn’t a YA version of WOMAN WARRIOR or THE BONESETTER’S DAUGHTER or BONE. But I don’t necessarily think that YA writers need to show what teen characters will become, because I don’t believe that people stay they people they are at 15. I didn’t read Park and believe he continued on wishing he’d been white. I read him as a snapshot of a moment, and imagined that he could grow and change the same as any of us. I don’t think 35 year old Park would be just a larger version of 15 year old Park.

    But seriously—a great and interesting post. These sorts of discussions are so vital, so important.

    I actually believe that you can be a fan of problematic things and I do understand why people love this book. And as an adult, I can hope that Park grows out of his self-loathing. But this book is aimed at young people - teenagers. And I have to ask, what do they take away? Will they have the maturity to say “he’ll grow out of it” or will their take away be Park would rather be white?” Because that was my take away and that was why this book hurt. And I don’t think my criticism  was about  showing what Park’s character would become in the future. It was based solely on who he is in the book - a self-loathing boy who would rather be white. I could have accepted this if he had had even a moment of recognizing his cultural roots. (I had mine at 16, the same age Park is in the book.) But he didn’t, and as a mother of Korean American girls who are battling their own feelings of cultural confusion, it is unacceptable that she left it like that. If an author is not going to address what is a fundamental issue for POC kids growing up in this country, then the author should reconsider writing POC, because writing POC comes with a responsibility to get it right and be respectful.

    Reblogging for Ellen’s further commentary.

    Ellen’s distinction in the additional commentary is important, because when we create media, what we put on the page is what we have to assume is taken at face value. We don’t get to say “well, this wasn’t expressly IN the book, but you could *possibly* assume this happened outside the context of the book.”

    THE CONTEXT OF THE BOOK is what matters. You can’t say “Dumbledore is gay” and expect that to mean anything when the canonical text gave no indication. When we have stuff like this, it must be contested and challenged and changed WITHIN THE TEXT to count.

    We need to do better than “well this wasn’t addressed in the text, but what was REALLY going on is…” or “what REALLY happened later is…” The media stands on its own and is consumed as-is. We don’t get caveats. The author may know the world outside the book, but the book itself is what the audience gets.

  3. Preparing you for awesome

    Hey guys… I thought I’d write a quick note to prep you for what will hopefully be the EPIC REVEAL next week of a project a friend and I are hoping to launch this summer. All I can tell you for now is that it is 1) focused on creating real change in the YA market, 2) about promoting diversity in literature, and 3) about building a community on multiple levels that can show the industry we mean business in an incredibly positive way that will support authors.

    PLEASE STAY TUNED.

  4. catagator:

    Kimberly and I are celebrating our 5 year blogging anniversary (!!!) with a huge giveaway at STACKED. We wanted to each pick 5 books that we’ve read in the past 5 years that have stuck with us in some way, and because we couldn’t narrow it down so much, we’re giving away 14 books, including 4 that are preorders. All are YA and cover everything from realistic fiction to humor to science fiction and fantasy. 

    If anything, it’s a reflection of the STACKED flavor.

    Good luck

  5. malindalo:

    diversityinya:

    Diversity in 2013 New York Times Young Adult Bestsellers

    Over the past year or so, I’ve examined diversity in the Publishers Weekly bestsellers (here’s 2012 and here’s 2013) as well as the Best Fiction for Young Adults (here’s 2013, here’s 2014). One list I haven’t looked at until now is the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books.

    My conclusions? There’s nothing really surprising about the diversity on the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books. They tell the same story that Publishers Weekly does, but with a slightly different sample: There isn’t much diversity.

    [Continue Reading]

    Here’s my latest number crunching on diversity. I reread the post this morning and realized that I sound rather dour, but I guess that’s the result of repeated diversity counts that show diversity hovering around 15%. I suppose 15% isn’t as terrible as it could be, but it’s disheartening because some of the books in that 15% are really problematic when it comes to representation. And there are no black or Latino main characters, unless you count Every Day by David Levithan as all races.

    The percentage of books with LGBT main characters is closer to what people believe is the percentage of LGBT people in the US, but it still depresses me because among the YA bestsellers (single title list), only one title (Battle Magic by Tamora Pierce) has a queer girl in it, and she’s one of three POV characters (from what I can tell from my research; I haven’t read the book). Among the series, there are no books with a lesbian main character, although Pretty Little Liars continues to represent with its bisexual character Emily, which may or may not be a positive thing depending on whether you think of her as Emily from the book series, or Emily from the TV series.

    Anyway. I don’t think I’m going to be doing much of this counting anymore. It doesn’t show much beyond the fact that bestsellers are predominantly white and straight, which we all knew. I’m trying to see it as motivation to keep writing, as opposed to depressing statistics about how what I’m writing is hard to sell to the masses.

  6. msnnews:

Remembering Gabriel Garcia Marquez: http://on-msn.com/1iu8tp4
    High Res

    msnnews:

    Remembering Gabriel Garcia Marquez: http://on-msn.com/1iu8tp4

  7. Until you’re about the age of twenty, you read everything, and you like it simply because you are reading it. Then between twenty and thirty you pick what you want, and you read the best, you read all the great works. After that you sit and wait for them to be written. But you know, the least known, the least famous writers, they are the better ones.
  8. teenlibrariantoolbox:

    Some upcoming GLBTQ titles #yalit

    (via yahighway)

  9. Diversity Is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing

    tubooks:

    (via richincolor)

  10. lesbianvenom:

seventeen magazine has officially lost it


Please don’t do this, my god. You don’t need me to tell you this, but wow.
    High Res

    lesbianvenom:

    seventeen magazine has officially lost it

    Please don’t do this, my god. You don’t need me to tell you this, but wow.

    (via yahighway)