1. weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, try The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani because both have massive world-building, mysterious villains, and a malevolent tournament at its climax.
    High Res

    weneeddiversebooks:

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, try The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani because both have massive world-building, mysterious villains, and a malevolent tournament at its climax.

  2. The older I got, the more often I met girls who were living the stories I wanted, the stories that taught me how to make my own life in their image: girls who hopped trains, hitchhiked alone across continents, vagabonded through other countries, bicycled solo for thousands of miles, wandered without company through wildernesses. But for the most part, those girls’ stories—our stories—are left off the printed page. We get dragons, sure; we can be sorceresses and princesses, witches and swordswomen, assassins and vampires and robber brides and queens. Sometimes we even get to be monsters. But a girl whose heart’s too big for her body, a girl whose whole self says go out the door and keep going—that girl’s still got to write her own book.

    So I did.
  3. aprihop:

    behindthebloom:

    It’s all the covers for our new YA books for winter 2015, all in one place—including your first-ever look at the cover for Emery Lord’s The Start of Me and You! And don’t think this is all we’ve got. There’s one more super special reveal coming this Thursday right here!

    count me in for THIS SIDE OF HOME, a novel that appears to involve gentrification and its impact on families and relationships. helllooOOOOO.

    and for emery lord’s next because open road summer was exactly the book i needed at exactly the right time. 

  4. weneeddiversebooks:

Have you seen the awesome diverse cover for hannahmosk's next book, NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED? Brown girl front and center. Here's the blurb:

Etta is tired of dealing with all of the labels and categories that seem so important to everyone else in her small Nebraska hometown.
Everywhere she turns, someone feels she’s too fringe for the fringe. Not gay enough for the Dykes, her ex-clique, thanks to a recent relationship with a boy; not tiny and white enough for ballet, her first passion; and not sick enough to look anorexic (partially thanks to recovery). Etta doesn’t fit anywhere— until she meets Bianca, the straight, white, Christian, and seriously sick girl in Etta’s therapy group. Both girls are auditioning for Brentwood, a prestigious New York theater academy that is so not Nebraska. Bianca seems like Etta’s salvation, but how can Etta be saved by a girl who needs saving herself? The latest powerful, original novel from Hannah Moskowitz is the story about living in and outside communities and stereotypes, and defining your own identity.

    weneeddiversebooks:

    Have you seen the awesome diverse cover for hannahmosk's next book, NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED? Brown girl front and center. Here's the blurb:

    Etta is tired of dealing with all of the labels and categories that seem so important to everyone else in her small Nebraska hometown.


    Everywhere she turns, someone feels she’s too fringe for the fringe. Not gay enough for the Dykes, her ex-clique, thanks to a recent relationship with a boy; not tiny and white enough for ballet, her first passion; and not sick enough to look anorexic (partially thanks to recovery). Etta doesn’t fit anywhere— until she meets Bianca, the straight, white, Christian, and seriously sick girl in Etta’s therapy group. Both girls are auditioning for Brentwood, a prestigious New York theater academy that is so not Nebraska. Bianca seems like Etta’s salvation, but how can Etta be saved by a girl who needs saving herself? 

    The latest powerful, original novel from Hannah Moskowitz is the story about living in and outside communities and stereotypes, and defining your own identity.

  5. owning-my-truth:

"Motherfuckers will read a book that is 1/3 elvish, but put two sentences in Spanish and they think we’re taking over." Junot Diaz to the interview questions, "Do you think using Spanish in your writing alienates some of your readers?"
    High Res

    owning-my-truth:

    "Motherfuckers will read a book that is 1/3 elvish, but put two sentences in Spanish and they think we’re taking over." Junot Diaz to the interview questions, "Do you think using Spanish in your writing alienates some of your readers?"

    (via lorimlee)

  6. Kody Keplinger interviews April Henry + GIRL, STOLEN giveaway! | Disability in Kidlit

    disabilityinkidlit:

    As a blind woman (and formerly a blind teenager), I’ve found it very difficult – damn near impossible – to find books that accurately portray blind characters. This is why April Henry’s Girl, Stolen was such a pleasant surprise for me. The main character, Cheyenne, is a teenager who lost most of her sight a few years prior to the events of the story. One day she is in the backseat of her stepmother’s car when it is stolen by a teenage boy named Griffin, who might be in just as much danger as Cheyenne when they return to his father’s house.

    Cheyenne is a well-researched, well-written example of blindness. It’s not her whole life, though it is a part of it. She’s not always bitter and angry about her disability, but she’s not constantly cheerful either. She uses what little vision she has in a way that felt very real to me. And, as a guide dog user myself, her anxiety over not having her guide dog with her during these horrifying events felt very authentic. I was so impressed that I had interview April Henry–New York Times-bestselling author of nearly 20 mysteries and thrillers for teens and adults!–about creating Cheyenne and the story of Girl, Stolen.”

    [read the interview!]

    In honor of Disability in Kidlit's one-year anniversary, you have a chance to win a signed copy of April Henry’s YA contemporary novel Girl, Stolen, featuring a blind protagonist. Simply leave a comment on the WordPress post or reblog this Tumblr post. (Yes, doing both increases your chances!) In one week, we’ll select a single winner from one of these locations. This giveaway is limited to US addresses.

  7. weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, try Moribito by Nahoko Uehashi because both have strong female warriors who must face the greatest evil to save their world.
    High Res

    weneeddiversebooks:

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, try Moribito by Nahoko Uehashi because both have strong female warriors who must face the greatest evil to save their world.

  8. inkyopinions:

    Book review: American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

    This book resonated with me on a completely unexpected level.

    American Born Chinese follows three seemingly separate narratives about identity, transformation, and the struggle to belong.  The first is of the legendary Monkey King, the second of a Chinese-American boy, and the third of a white guy and his cousin, Chin-Kee, a walking racist stereotype of Chinese people in America.  The stories parallel each other throughout the novel, and at the end, they fit together in a clever twist.

    Full disclosure: I am an American-born Chinese.  As such, my reaction to this book is colored by my experiences, and I have no idea if someone who doesn’t share them would enjoy it as much as I did.  To be fair, not all my experiences match up with those depicted in the novel, but I did grow up on Journey to the West picture books in simplified Chinese, and my engagement with the story of the Monkey King can partly be attributed to the fact that I already love him.

    That being said, American Born Chinese has a lot going for it, even if I’m trying to be objective: the neatly entwined storylines, the examination of loneliness, the shrewd commentary on stereotypes, both negative and ostensibly positive.  The art, while not beautiful, is colorful and effective, and the humor lifts some of the heavier themes.  Overall, it’s a fast and fascinating read—worth a visit to the library and an hour of your time.  While it may not be accessible to all readers, there’s very little reason not to at least give it a shot.

    Rating: ★★★★☆