1. harperclassroom:

    Today we are getting to know the wonderfully talented ALICE KUIPERS.  Alice is the bestselling, award-winning author of Life on the Refrigerator Door, The Worst Thing She Ever Did, 40 Things I Want To Tell You.

    Her newest bookThe Death of Us, hit bookshelves everywhere this week!   Find her at alicekuipers.com for writing tips to bring into your classroom!

    Q&A with Alice Kuipers 

    1. Have you always wanted to be an author (or did you want to be a firefighter or an astronaut?)

    I’ve always read a lot, and writing seemed to grow naturally from that. When I was younger, I didn’t imagine I would actually ever publish books. Then, as I wrote more, the idea of physical books seized my imagination too and I began to be more serious about my writing. I thought I wanted to be an actor for a few years, but I never acted or read plays. I realized it was a total fantasy.

    2. What was your favourite book (picture/novel) growing up?

    I loved Charlotte’s Web. I still do. It’s a beautifully written book. And sooooo sad.

    3. Are you like any of the characters in your books?
    Like Sophie, in The Worst Thing She Ever Did, I used to have panic attacks. Writing about that was really profound for me. In The Death of Us, I see a little bit of myself in both Callie and Ivy – you’ll have to see if you can figure out in what way!


    4. Do you have a special hideout where you like to write? 
    I sneak out the house and go to cafes sometimes. I put in headphones and write, write, write. Or I listen to the conversations of people sitting near me and secretly find inspiration. My main character in my next novel is a singer/songwriter, so I’m listening to loads of great music. It’s less about the place for me and much more about what I can hear.


    5. What is your favourite, or the most rewarding, thing about being a teen author?
    Great question. I love seeing all the YA bloggers out there. There are amazing passionate readers on the internet, who give frank, honest opinions about the books they read. Getting a great review from one of them is very rewarding. But even better than that is when a teenager comes up to me and tells me that one of my books got them reading again – books have been such a mainstay of my life that it feels good to open that door for a potential reader to discover the world of books.

    6.  Who is your favourite teacher in a book/movie/tv show and why?
    Miss. Honey was such a sweetheart in Matilda, by Roald Dahl. But it was Agatha Trunchbull – the crazy headmistress – who stuck in my mind. What a great character to write!

    7.  Who was your favourite teacher or librarian while growing up? 
    A teacher really inspired me when I was at Sydenham High School. His name was Mr. Jope. He got us to write a novel when we were only about eleven or twelve and that experience stayed with me.

    8.  In your opinion, what makes a good story? 
    I think the main character has to grow or change during a great story. In that change, the story lies. If the character stays static and unaffected by a narrative, then the story is only an anecdote. Steven Galloway taught me that – he’s a writer who lives in Vancouver and I was at a workshop with him when I was writing Life on the Refrigerator Door. I credit him with helping me shift from unpublished to published writer and it was basically that idea about characters changing that got me there.

  2. 
On the Shelf: LET’S GET LOST »

    On the Shelf: LET’S GET LOST »

    (via )

  3. pickeringtonlibrary:

As many of you know, horror novels in YA can be tough to find.  And they can be even harder to classify - is this bloody horror or is this mess-with-your-mind-cause-there’s-something-in-my-closet horror?
So we gave it a shot.
And we really did try to get a little bit of everything on here, even for those who aren’t horror fans at all but still might like a zombie novel or two, or a dash of necromancy/humor.
Whether you’re a seasoned horror fan or just getting your start, we hope you find a few chills and thrills within.  Here are the books featured (and remember, like all of our genre/theme booklists, we don’t leave any title out on purpose.)  You can also find this booklist on Pinterest, if you want to view it in full-size browser glory.
Ashes by Ilsa Bick
The Enemy by Charlie Higson
Rot & Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
Dark Inside by Jeyn Roberts
The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan
Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
Eat, Brains, Love by Jeff Hart
Dearly, Departed by Lia Habel
Something Strange and Deadly by Susan Dennard
This Is Not A Test by Courtney Summers
Generation Dead by Daniel Waters
You Are So Undead To Me by Stacey Jay
Zombie Queen of Newbury High by Amanda Ashbury
Rotters by Daniel Kraus
The Replacement by Brenna Yovanoff
The Twelve-Fingered Boy by John Hornor Jacobs
Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride
Man-Made Boy by John Skovron
Project Cain by Geoffrey Girard
The Waking Dark by Robin Wasserman
Scowler by Daniel Kraus
I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga
The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey
This Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel
The Girl From The Well by Rin Chupeco
Fiendish by Brenna Yovanoff
Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
Amity by Micol Ostow
Welcome to the Dark House by Laurie Faria Stolarz
MARY:  The Summoning by Hilary Monahan
The Fall by Bethan Griffin
Winterkill by Kate A. Boorman
Another Little Piece by Kate Karyus Quinn
Creed by Trisha Leaver & Lindsay Currie
    High Res

    pickeringtonlibrary:

    As many of you know, horror novels in YA can be tough to find.  And they can be even harder to classify - is this bloody horror or is this mess-with-your-mind-cause-there’s-something-in-my-closet horror?

    So we gave it a shot.

    And we really did try to get a little bit of everything on here, even for those who aren’t horror fans at all but still might like a zombie novel or two, or a dash of necromancy/humor.

    Whether you’re a seasoned horror fan or just getting your start, we hope you find a few chills and thrills within.  Here are the books featured (and remember, like all of our genre/theme booklists, we don’t leave any title out on purpose.)  You can also find this booklist on Pinterest, if you want to view it in full-size browser glory.

  4. yainterrobang:

HAPPY #DIVERSITYTHURSDAY!Nominated by: ShawnGenre: fantasyDiversity: disabled characters, LGBTQIA+ characters, characters of colorThis Thursday, we celebrate our first-ever #diversitythursday! This week, we bring attention to Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis.In Otherbound…

Amara is never alone. Not when she’s protecting the cursed princess she unwillingly serves. Not when they’re fleeing across dunes and islands and seas to stay alive. Not when she’s punished, ordered around, or neglected. She can’t be alone, because a boy from another world experiences all that alongside her, looking through her eyes. Nolan longs for a life uninterrupted. Every time he blinks, he’s yanked from his Arizona town into Amara’s mind, a world away, which makes even simple things like hobbies and homework impossible. He’s spent years as a powerless observer of Amara’s life. Amara has no idea … until he learns to control her, and they communicate for the first time. Amara is terrified. Then, she’s furious. All Amara and Nolan want is to be free of each other. But Nolan’s breakthrough has dangerous consequences. Now, they’ll have to work together to survive–and discover the truth about their connection. 

Have you read Otherbound? Tell us your thoughts! Send us an ask! Tweet us at @yainterrobang with your opinions. As always, #diversitythursday is about bringing attention to books with diverse characters and spreading the word - so talk about them, especially if you relate to the book!

    yainterrobang:

    HAPPY #DIVERSITYTHURSDAY!
    Nominated by: Shawn
    Genre: fantasy
    Diversity: disabled characters, LGBTQIA+ characters, characters of color

    This Thursday, we celebrate our first-ever #diversitythursday! This week, we bring attention to Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis.

    In Otherbound

    Amara is never alone. Not when she’s protecting the cursed princess she unwillingly serves. Not when they’re fleeing across dunes and islands and seas to stay alive. Not when she’s punished, ordered around, or neglected.

    She can’t be alone, because a boy from another world experiences all that alongside her, looking through her eyes.

    Nolan longs for a life uninterrupted. Every time he blinks, he’s yanked from his Arizona town into Amara’s mind, a world away, which makes even simple things like hobbies and homework impossible. He’s spent years as a powerless observer of Amara’s life.

    Amara has no idea … until he learns to control her, and they communicate for the first time. Amara is terrified. Then, she’s furious.

    All Amara and Nolan want is to be free of each other. But Nolan’s breakthrough has dangerous consequences. Now, they’ll have to work together to survive–and discover the truth about their connection.

    Have you read Otherbound? Tell us your thoughts! Send us an ask! Tweet us at @yainterrobang with your opinions. As always, #diversitythursday is about bringing attention to books with diverse characters and spreading the word - so talk about them, especially if you relate to the book!

  5. fishingboatproceeds:

SO SO SO SO SO SO EXCITED that the brilliant Jacqueline Woodson's book Brown Girl Dreaming is a New York Times bestseller.
It’s a fascinating and beautiful memoir-in-verse about the way that history shapes the lives of individuals, and how one girl grew up. Woodson is one of our best and smartest writers for children, but as an adult who has read this book twice in the last couple months, I can tell you that this book is truly for everyone.
YAY YAY YAY YAY.

DO YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND WHAT BIG NEWS THIS IS
THIS IS SUCH BIG NEWS
FUCK YES, JACQUELINE WOODSON, FUCK YES
    High Res

    fishingboatproceeds:

    SO SO SO SO SO SO EXCITED that the brilliant Jacqueline Woodson's book Brown Girl Dreaming is a New York Times bestseller.

    It’s a fascinating and beautiful memoir-in-verse about the way that history shapes the lives of individuals, and how one girl grew up. Woodson is one of our best and smartest writers for children, but as an adult who has read this book twice in the last couple months, I can tell you that this book is truly for everyone.

    YAY YAY YAY YAY.

    DO YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND WHAT BIG NEWS THIS IS

    THIS IS SUCH BIG NEWS

    FUCK YES, JACQUELINE WOODSON, FUCK YES

  6. jadelewisthebarista:

    "I want a book with POC."

    image

    "I want a science fiction book."

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    "I want a book with accurate representations of queer characters."

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    "I want an action book."

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    "I want a book where the main focus isn’t romance."

    image

    "I want a book that will make me cry."

    image

    "I want-"

    image

    (via ricktransitgloriamundi)

  7. paperbackd:

    A masterpost of YA books (and a few crossover MG titles) to be released in September 2014.  Check out this month’s new releases below.  Feel free to use this as a guide to this month’s releases, but please do not repost it in its entirety elsewhere.  If you found this masterpost helpful, a like, reblog, or link back to Paperback’d would be much appreciated! If you know of a YA book to be released this month that isn’t on the list, drop me a message and I’ll update it!

    Read More

    (via iheartyabooks)

  8. diversityinya:

    Diversity in YA’s 2014 Back to School Giveaway

    It’s September, which means we’re back to business as usual here at DiYA and many of you are back to school! To celebrate the fall, we’re giving away these nine awesome new and upcoming diverse young adult books to three lucky winners.

    Here’s how this will work:

    1. We’ve divided these nine books into three packs of three:

    Prize Pack 1: Thriller/Science Fiction

    Prize Pack 2: Realistic Fiction

    Prize Pack 3: Nonfiction

    2. We will pick three winners to receive one prize pack each. (You can tell us which prize pack you prefer in the entry form.)

    3. Because of the cost of international shipping, we are only able to ship to U.S. mailing addresses. International folks may enter as long as they have a U.S. mailing address.

    4. Teachers and librarians get an extra entry for free!

    5. The deadline to enter is the end of the day, Sept. 19, 2014.

    Enter here:

    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    If you can’t see the entry form widget above, go here to enter.

    Thank you to Arthur A. Levine Books; Cinco Puntos; Harlequin Teen; Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; and Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for generously donating copies of these books for this giveaway.

    (via medievalpoc)

  9. paperbackd:

    Weekly YA Spotlight: A selection of the most anticipated new YA novels released this week (31/08 - 06/08)

    Heir of Fire (Throne of Glass #3) by Sarah J. Maas ✤ September 2nd

    The Secret Sky by Atia Abawi ✤ September 2nd

    Blackfin Sky by Kat Ellis ✤ September 2nd

    The Memory Keepers by Natasha Ngan ✤ September 4th

    Zac & Mia by A.J. Betts ✤ September 2nd

    Shattered (Scorched #2) by Mari Mancusi ✤ September 2nd

    Check out the rest of this month’s new YA releases here!