1. Interview with Sara Farizan

    diversityinya:

    The author of If You Could Be Mine talks about her new lesbian YA novel, Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel, a light-hearted romantic comedy about an Iranian American teen girl.

    By Malinda Lo

    image

    Sara Farizan made a huge splash in the YA world last year with her debut novel, If…

    (via weneeddiversebooks)

  2. Hi Mrs. Stiefvater. I actually have a question so unrelated to any of your books. A lot of your readers are in the 18-20 range (I'm 19), and idk if others have the same problem with me. You're so successful now and you have a good head on your shoulders & good friends. Was your life always put together? I mean, for me right now, college debt is depressing and I have zero friends (except my mom, she's my bff). Basically, does life get better? Thanks ~

    delilahsdawson:

    maggie-stiefvater:

    A disclaimer: I am not you. You are not me. We are not, collectively, anyone else, so your results may vary. I have a very high tolerance for personal discomfort and/ or living in squalor, which means the life choices I opted for in pursuit of happiness may not work for other people.

    1. Yes, 18-19 was grotesque. I think it’s grotesque for many because it’s the time you realize that you are now going to be responsible for your personal happiness: CONGRATULATIONS YOU’RE AN ADULT-THING

    2. So you’re not a kid, but it’s not exactly like you’re out in the real world doing what you want to do yet. You’re a strange possibly gross magical creature who is somehow still growing, who is aware of the right thing to say or do but somehow manages to do something else by mistake, who has possibly grown away from childhood friends, who is dimly conscious that there must be other humans out there to form a life-long bond of coolness with but somehow cannot find these future blood-brothers anywhere. This is frustrating at best and paralyzing at worst.

    3. Do not be paralyzed. The ones who freeze are the ones who get eaten by the predators first.

    4. Unless your life-goal was to be eaten by predators, in which case: go.

    5. I wanted to be an artist, a musician, or a writer; that was the goal. No. That was not the goal. I knew I didn’t want to have an ordinary life. I wanted every day to be different — to feel no regrets — to feel like when I got to the end, I’d really done something.

    6. Here’s the moment that changed my life forever: after graduating, I became a technical editor for kindly federal contractors. The job was fine. Not what I’d dreamed of, but a paycheck with benefits and a roof over my head. I realized that there was a version of me that could stay in this job for the rest of my life, benevolently compromising. That was the day I walked into my boss’s office and gave my two weeks notice. “What are you going to do?” he asked, surprised. “I’m going to be a portrait artist,” I replied. He said, “But you were a history major.” I told him I reckoned that if I worked at my art for 40 hours a week as I worked at technical editing, I’d get good enough to make a living. He told me that I could have my job back at any time. I didn’t go back. I gave up my nice salary and my future that was fine, only fine. My life became dry pasta and scrounging desperately under seats for change to put fuel in the car. It was the best thing I ever did: I was happy. Terrified, sometimes, because I had to put myself in unfamiliar situations every week and trust myself. But happy.

    7. Which is to say that happiness is hard work, and I’m suspicious when I’m not chasing it. It doesn’t just sit there: content waits for you. Happiness runs, a gleeful moving target that changes as you change. I understand this belief may be because I am insane, but in case you’re also insane, I’m putting it out there.

    8. I do indeed have a pack of lovely close friends, but I didn’t find most of them until my mid-twenties. And I didn’t find them in real life: I found them online, and then we met in person. So my best friends live in Kansas, in Colorado, in Georgia. I have people I am fine with locally, but I have yet to find a blood-brother in my home town. Embrace that whatever brand of strangeness you are, there is someone else complementary to you, but they might be two thousand miles away. The Internet is a great thing for strange people.

    9. On the topic of complementary people: I never dated people who didn’t think I was great, nor did I pine away longing for a date. A lot of my peers made themselves miserable by dating people they could never be friends with. I don’t tend to think great relationships are formed with someone you had to harpoon; I think if you’re doing what you love and putting yourself out there, friends will come along, and some of those will be kissable. I’d rather be alone than with someone I’m just fine with. I’m great company.

    10. I have to confess that the burst of joy I felt when I realized I was going to have 10 points to this reply was all out of proportion with the actual accomplishment. In conclusion, yes: my life gets better every year. I’m happier now than I was at 25, and I thought I was happy then. I am more myself every year. 

    So much all of this. Comfort is not happiness.

  3. We Need Diverse Books Panel-a-palooza This Week

    weneeddiversebooks:

    There’ll be several WNDB Panels happening this week starting at NYCC on October 9th then KidLitCon and BinderCon over the weekend. Here’s a list of where our exec board and team members will be. So if you happen to be at any of those conferences stop by! 

    New York ComicCon, October 9th:

    5:15-6pm: Ilene W. Gregorio will moderate a panel on diversity in Comic Books.

    8-8:45pm: Ilene will also be at the “Geeks of Color Go Pro” event.

    KidLitCon, October 11th:

    1:30-3pm: Mike Jung, Stacey Lee, Karen Sandler, S.E. Sinkhorn, and Martha White will present at the “Book Bloggers & Diversity” panel.

    BinderCon, October 12th:

    2-3pm: Dhonielle Clayton, Stacy Whitman, and Marietta Zacker will talk about WNDB, Diversity in Literature, and have a Q&A.

  4. stacylwhitman:

tubooks:

Click here to win a signed copy of the TANKBORN trilogy by Karen Sandler! 

Go enter! It’s such a wonderful trilogy.
    High Res

    stacylwhitman:

    tubooks:

    Click here to win a signed copy of the TANKBORN trilogy by Karen Sandler! 

    Go enter! It’s such a wonderful trilogy.

  5. diversityinya:

    This week’s diverse new releases are:

    Double Exposure by Bridget Birdsall (Sky Pony Press)

    “Alyx, an intersex teen, leaves California for Milwaukee to live as a girl for the first time. … Tall and a lover of basketball, Alyx becomes quick friends with her school’s varsity team, including pushy and dangerously hot-tempered Patti ”Pepper“ Pitmani. Background information about intersex conditions and Alyx’s own experience of her body are woven easily into the text, informative without being either dry or sensationalistic.” — Kirkus

    Night Sky by Suzanne Brockmann and Melanie Brockmann (Sourcebooks Fire)

    “Best known for her romantic thrillers, Suzanne Brockmann teams up with her daughter Melanie for a YA adventure set in her Fighting Destiny world. Sixteen-year-old Skylar Reid is shocked to discover that she’s a Greater-Than, born with superhuman powers. … Skylar joins her wheelchair-bound friend Calvin, motorcycle-riding bad girl Dana, and mysterious hottie Milo to rescue a missing child and bring down those who would exploit people like her.” — Publishers Weekly

    Alice + Freda Forever: A Murder in Memphis by Alexis Coe (Pulp/Zest)

    “The year was 1892, and 19-year-old Alice Mitchell was in love with Freda Ward, 17. She determined that if she couldn’t marry Freda, nobody else would, either. … This is a captivating account, and readers will quickly become absorbed in the suspense surrounding Freda’s murder. Additionally, the book provides a foundation for discussion of sociocultural themes, such as how LGBT relationships have historically been viewed by society, gender and femininity, and even journalism.” — School Library Journal, starred review

    Exquisite Captive by Heather Demetrios (Balzer + Bray)

    “Nalia lives in a mansion in the Hollywood Hills, a glittering world of parties and fast cars. She can have anything she wants—except her freedom. Nalia is ”just another jinni on the dark caravan“ of the slave trade, forced to spend her days granting wishes on behalf of her human master, Malek, in order to advance his wealth and power. … The story unfolds at a swift, even pace, and the worldbuilding is superb; the jinn inhabit an intoxicating, richly realized realm of magic, politics, spirituality and history. Readers will wish they had a jinni to grant them the next book in the series.” — Kirkus, starred review

    Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel by Sara Farizan (Algonquin)

    “With self-deprecating wit and a keen eye for interpersonal dynamics, Iranian-American narrator Leila Azadi details the dramas taking place in the intersecting circles of her elite New England private school and high-achieving Persian community. When a family friend comes out, his parents’ obnoxious bragging turns to silence, causing Leila to fear being disowned for her “lady-loving inclinations.” … Farizan exceeds the high expectations she set with her debut, If You Could Be Mine, in this fresh, humorous, and poignant exploration of friendship and love, a welcome addition to the coming-out/coming-of-age genre.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

    The Family by Marissa Kennerson (Full Fathom Five)

    Book Description: Just like any average seventeen year old, Twig loves her family. She has a caring mother and a controlling father. Her brothers and sisters are committed to her family’s prosperity…

    All one hundred and eighty three of them.

    Twig lives in the Family, a collective society located in the rainforest of Costa Rica. The Family members coexist with the values of complete openness and honesty, and a shared fear of contagious infection in the outside world.

    So when Adam, their Father, prophet, and savior, announces that Twig will be his new bride, she is overjoyed and honored. But when an injury forces her to leave the grounds, Twig finds that the world outside is not necessarily as toxic as she was made to believe. When she meets Leo, an American boy with a killer smile, she begins to question everything about her life within the Family, and the cult to which she belongs.

    But when it comes to your Family, you don’t always get a choice.

    The Young Elites by Marie Lu (Putnam)

    “A new series—fantasy, this time—from the author of the best-selling Legend dystopia. … In a gorgeously constructed world that somewhat resembles Renaissance Italy but with its own pantheon, geography and fauna, the multiethnic and multisexual Young Elites offer a cinematically perfect ensemble of gorgeous-but-unusual illusionists, animal speakers, fire summoners and wind callers. A must for fans of Kristin Cashore’s Fire (2009) and other totally immersive fantasies.” — Kirkus, starred review

    Kiss Kill Vanish by Jessica Martinez (Katherine Tegen Books)

    “After discovering that her father and boyfriend are killers, 17-year-old Valentina Cruz runs away to Montreal. Penniless, she lives in a rented closet, works as an artist’s model, and practices her stolen mandolin by night in an empty cafe. She thinks the music will sustain her good memories of her boyfriend, Emilio, who taught her to play. … Valentina’s decision making is sometimes opaque, but her strong voice, full of sensory imagery, and her exquisitely drawn relationships with Emilio, Marcel, and her father make this a memorable thriller.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

  6. catagator:

Another day, another webinar featuring “Books for Boys.” 
Gendered reading’s gotta stop.
    High Res

    catagator:

    Another day, another webinar featuring “Books for Boys.” 

    Gendered reading’s gotta stop.

    (via katethulhu)

  7. Don't ever hesitate. Reblog this. TUMBLR RULE. When you see it, REBLOG IT.

    • The original post only has US helplines. I've added UK helplines underneath. It would be great if people could add numbers from everywhere in the world.
    • Depression Hotline: 1-630-482-9696
    • Suicide Hotline: 1-800-784-8433
    • LifeLine: 1-800-273-8255
    • Trevor Project: 1-866-488-7386
    • Sexuality Support: 1-800-246-7743
    • Eating Disorders Hotline: 1-847-831-3438
    • Rape and Sexual Assault: 1-800-656-4673
    • Grief Support: 1-650-321-5272
    • Runaway: 1-800-843-5200, 1-800-843-5678, 1-800-621-4000
    • Exhale: After Abortion Hotline/Pro-Voice: 1-866-4394253
    • Child Abuse: 1-800-422-4453
    • UK Helplines:
    • Samaritans (for any problem): 08457909090 e-mail jo@samaritans.org
    • Childline (for anyone under 18 with any problem): 08001111
    • Mind infoline (mental health information): 0300 123 3393 e-mail: info@mind.org.uk
    • Mind legal advice (for people who need mental-health related legal advice): 0300 466 6463 legal@mind.org.uk
    • b-eat eating disorder support: 0845 634 14 14 (only open Mon-Fri 10.30am-8.30pm and Saturday 1pm-4.30pm) e-mail: help@b-eat.co.uk
    • b-eat youthline (for under 25's with eating disorders): 08456347650 (open Mon-Fri 4.30pm - 8.30pm, Saturday 1pm-4.30pm)
    • Cruse Bereavement Care: 08444779400 e-mail: helpline@cruse.org.uk
    • Frank (information and advice on drugs): 0800776600
    • Drinkline: 0800 9178282
    • Rape Crisis England & Wales: 0808 802 9999 1(open 2 - 2.30pm 7 - 9.30pm) e-mail info@rapecrisis.org.uk
    • Rape Crisis Scotland: 08088 01 03 02 every day, 6pm to midnight
    • India Self Harm Hotline: 00 08001006614
    • India Suicide Helpline: 022-27546669
    • Kids Help Phone (Canada): 1-800-668-6868, Free and available 24/7
    • suicide hotlines;
    • Argentina: 54-0223-493-0430
    • Australia: 13-11-14
    • Austria: 01-713-3374
    • Barbados: 429-9999
    • Belgium: 106
    • Botswana: 391-1270
    • Brazil: 21-233-9191
    • China: 852-2382-0000
    • (Hong Kong: 2389-2222)
    • Costa Rica: 606-253-5439
    • Croatia: 01-4833-888
    • Cyprus: 357-77-77-72-67
    • Czech Republic: 222-580-697, 476-701-908
    • Denmark: 70-201-201
    • Egypt: 762-1602
    • Estonia: 6-558-088
    • Finland: 040-5032199
    • France: 01-45-39-4000
    • Germany: 0800-181-0721
    • Greece: 1018
    • Guatemala: 502-234-1239
    • Holland: 0900-0767
    • Honduras: 504-237-3623
    • Hungary: 06-80-820-111
    • Iceland: 44-0-8457-90-90-90
    • Israel: 09-8892333
    • Italy: 06-705-4444
    • Japan: 3-5286-9090
    • Latvia: 6722-2922, 2772-2292
    • Malaysia: 03-756-8144
    • (Singapore: 1-800-221-4444)
    • Mexico: 525-510-2550
    • Netherlands: 0900-0767
    • New Zealand: 4-473-9739
    • New Guinea: 675-326-0011
    • Nicaragua: 505-268-6171
    • Norway: 47-815-33-300
    • Philippines: 02-896-9191
    • Poland: 52-70-000
    • Portugal: 239-72-10-10
    • Russia: 8-20-222-82-10
    • Spain: 91-459-00-50
    • South Africa: 0861-322-322
    • South Korea: 2-715-8600
    • Sweden: 031-711-2400
    • Switzerland: 143
    • Taiwan: 0800-788-995
    • Thailand: 02-249-9977
    • Trinidad and Tobago: 868-645-2800
    • Ukraine: 0487-327715
  8. bethrevis:

    bethrevis:

     I love fan art.  I don’t think I’ll ever get tired of seeing the scenes my readers have created, the way they envision my characters. Fan art has brought me to tears before. It has introduced me to some of my favorite artists. I even have an oil painting made by a reader hanging on my wall. Some of the best fan art is on tumblr. And I knew tumblr was the perfect place to find people to work with on a special project: the Limited Edition of my upcoming book, The Body Electric.

    Read on to discover how I used tumblr to find artists for a very special version of my newest book, and how to get your own copies of all this art and more:

    Read More

    TODAY IS THE DAY!!! THE BODY ELECTRIC IS OFFICIALLY ON SALE!

    (via sarahreesbrennan)

  9. wearetatal:


We are serious fans of Jandy Nelson’s first book, so you better believe we were excited to find out that a new book was coming. Katie gets the scoop:

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy NelsonI’ve spent the past few days trying to come up with the perfect analogy for this book. So far all I’ve got is it’s The Sky Is Everywhere (see full review) meets Graffiti Moon (see more posts) meets Jellicoe Road (see full review)on crack. Or something like that. Or, put more simply, it’s magnificent.This is the story of twins: Jude and Noah. Noah gives us his side of the story starting at age 13. Jude picks up her side of the story three years later, a very different person from the one Noah introduced us to. Somewhere in between the twins have gone from being each other’s safe place to virtual strangers who share a wall. As each twin tells their side of the story in alternating chapters, a larger picture unfolds where we’re taken on a trip through time, through art, through gorgeous language, family drama, romance, and heartbreak. To tell you much more than that about what happens would really just be stepping on Jude and Noah’s toes. This is their story.Full disclosure: I’ve been waiting years for Jandy Nelson to follow up The Sky Is Everywhere, and when that day finally came I was more than a little worried that there was no way my high expectations could be met. In the end, though, this sophomore effort left my expectations in the dust, surpassing them several times over. It’s dazzling, crackling with emotion and intelligence, the sort of book you have to text a friend about as you read, because such deliciousness is really meant to be shared. So make sure to pass it on when you’re done. :-)

    wearetatal:

    We are serious fans of Jandy Nelson’s first book, so you better believe we were excited to find out that a new book was coming. Katie gets the scoop:
    I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

    I’ve spent the past few days trying to come up with the perfect analogy for this book. So far all I’ve got is it’s
    The Sky Is Everywhere (see full review) meets Graffiti Moon (see more posts) meets Jellicoe Road (see full review)on crack. Or something like that. Or, put more simply, it’s magnificent.

    This is the story of twins: Jude and Noah. Noah gives us his side of the story starting at age 13. Jude picks up her side of the story three years later, a very different person from the one Noah introduced us to. Somewhere in between the twins have gone from being each other’s safe place to virtual strangers who share a wall. As each twin tells their side of the story in alternating chapters, a larger picture unfolds where we’re taken on a trip through time, through art, through gorgeous language, family drama, romance, and heartbreak. To tell you much more than that about what happens would really just be stepping on Jude and Noah’s toes. This is their story.

    Full disclosure: I’ve been waiting years for Jandy Nelson to follow up
    The Sky Is Everywhere, and when that day finally came I was more than a little worried that there was no way my high expectations could be met. In the end, though, this sophomore effort left my expectations in the dust, surpassing them several times over. It’s dazzling, crackling with emotion and intelligence, the sort of book you have to text a friend about as you read, because such deliciousness is really meant to be shared. So make sure to pass it on when you’re done. :-)
  10. pwplsteens:

    Here are some of the new releases coming your way this week at PWPLS:

    Always a Catch by Peter Richmond

    From a New York Times bestselling sports writer comes the story of one boy’s quest to stay true to himself without letting down his team. Jack and his father have never seen eye to eye…until Jack’s dad gives him the chance to transfer to Oakhurst his junior year. His dad sees it as a way for Jack to get into a good college; Jack sees it as refuge from his dad.
     
    Oakhurst is more than an escape—it’s a chance for Jack to do something new, to try out for the football team. Once Jack makes the team, he’s thrust into a foreign world—one of intense hazing, vitamin supplements, monkey hormones and steroids. Jack has to decide how far he’s willing to go to fit in—and how much he’s willing to compromise himself to be the man his team wants him to be.

    Beware the Wild by Natalie C. Parker

    The swamp in Sterling’s small Louisiana town proves to have a power over its inhabitants when her brother disappears and no one but Sterling even remembers that he existed. Now Sterling, with the help of brooding loner Heath, who’s had his own creepy experience with the swamp, must fight back and reclaim what—and who—the swamp has taken.

    Evil Librarian by Michelle Knudsen

    When Cynthia Rothschild’s best friend, Annie, falls head over heels for the new high-school librarian, Cyn can totally see why. He’s really young and super cute and thinks Annie would make an excellent library monitor. But after meeting Mr. Gabriel, Cyn realizes something isn’t quite right. Maybe it’s the creepy look in the librarian’s eyes, or the weird feeling Cyn gets whenever she’s around him. Before long Cyn realizes that Mr. Gabriel is, in fact … a demon. Now, in addition to saving the school musical from technical disaster and trying not to make a fool of herself with her own hopeless crush, Cyn has to save her best friend from the clutches of the evil librarian, who also seems to be slowly sucking the life force out of the entire student body! From best-selling author Michelle Knudsen, here is the perfect novel for teens who like their horror served up with a bit of romance, plenty of humor, and some pretty hot guys (of both the good and evil variety).

    Read More