1. Sure #WeNeedDiverseBooks but don’t forget #WeNeedMoreWalterDeanMyerses too

    "Like everyone I was shocked and saddened by the announcement that author Walter Dean Myers had recently passed away.  The first National Ambassador of Children’s Literature to leave us, there is little to say about his life that hasn’t been said by others far more eloquently than I in the last 24 hours.  However, I think it’s important to take into account the context in which the man lived.  Because we haven’t just lost a great author.  We’ve lost a man that filled a very great need in our children’s literary landscape."

  2. 
In Memoriam
Walter Dean Myers
1937-2014
You will be greatly missed.
    High Res

    In Memoriam

    Walter Dean Myers

    1937-2014

    You will be greatly missed.

    (Source: weneeddiversebooks)

  3. The news just broke… Walter Dean Myers has passed. In his lifetime, he wrote over 100 books, served as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, won too many awards and honors to list, advised and inspired kids and young writers everywhere, and impacted thousands of lives. He was a lifelong proponent of diversity in children’s literature, and just a few months ago wrote an article that once again sparked the discussion.

    Rest well, sir. You will be remembered always.

    Beyond this, words fail me.

  4. weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, try Fake ID by Lamar Giles because both involve death, a mystery, and a reluctant hero caught in between. Fans of the drama and intensity of Jay Asher’s perennial hit will find many things to love in Lamar Giles Thrilling debut.
    High Res

    weneeddiversebooks:

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, try Fake ID by Lamar Giles because both involve death, a mystery, and a reluctant hero caught in between. Fans of the drama and intensity of Jay Asher’s perennial hit will find many things to love in Lamar Giles Thrilling debut.

    (via elloellenoh)

  5. Introducing the winner of the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Book this year! Everyone should read it.
Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson
We’d had to be cut free of our mother’s womb. She’d never have been able to push the two-headed sport that was me and Abby out the usual way. Abby and I were fused, you see. Conjoined twins. Abby’s head, torso, and left arm protruded from my chest. But here’s the real kicker; Abby had the magic, I didn’t. Far as the Family was concerned, Abby was one of them, though cursed, as I was, with the tragic flaw of mortality.Now adults, Makeda and Abby still share their childhood home. The surgery to separate the two girls gave Abby a permanent limp, but left Makeda with what feels like an even worse deformity: no mojo. The daughters of a celestial demigod and a human woman, Makeda and Abby were raised by their magical father, the god of growing things—a highly unusual childhood that made them extremely close. Ever since Abby’s magical talent began to develop, though, in the form of an unearthly singing voice, the sisters have become increasingly distant.Today, Makeda has decided it’s high time to move out and make her own life among the other nonmagical, claypicken humans—after all, she’s one of them. In Cheerful Rest, a run-down warehouse space, Makeda finds exactly what she’s been looking for: an opportunity to live apart from Abby and begin building her own independent life. There’s even a resident band, led by the charismatic (and attractive) building superintendent.But when her father goes missing, Makeda will have to discover her own talent—and reconcile with Abby—if she’s to have a hope of saving him .
    High Res

    Introducing the winner of the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Book this year! Everyone should read it.

    Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson

    We’d had to be cut free of our mother’s womb. She’d never have been able to push the two-headed sport that was me and Abby out the usual way. Abby and I were fused, you see. Conjoined twins. Abby’s head, torso, and left arm protruded from my chest. But here’s the real kicker; Abby had the magic, I didn’t. Far as the Family was concerned, Abby was one of them, though cursed, as I was, with the tragic flaw of mortality.

    Now adults, Makeda and Abby still share their childhood home. The surgery to separate the two girls gave Abby a permanent limp, but left Makeda with what feels like an even worse deformity: no mojo. The daughters of a celestial demigod and a human woman, Makeda and Abby were raised by their magical father, the god of growing things—a highly unusual childhood that made them extremely close. Ever since Abby’s magical talent began to develop, though, in the form of an unearthly singing voice, the sisters have become increasingly distant.

    Today, Makeda has decided it’s high time to move out and make her own life among the other nonmagical, claypicken humans—after all, she’s one of them. In Cheerful Rest, a run-down warehouse space, Makeda finds exactly what she’s been looking for: an opportunity to live apart from Abby and begin building her own independent life. There’s even a resident band, led by the charismatic (and attractive) building superintendent.

    But when her father goes missing, Makeda will have to discover her own talent—and reconcile with Abby—if she’s to have a hope of saving him .

  6. Aisha Saeed: Ramadan, Books, and a plea: be the change you want to see***

    Using the hashtag #RamadanReads, we asked our communities on social media platforms to share their children’s, young adult, and adult book recommendations for our Ramadan/Eid gift list. We based the extensive list below on your feedback.

    This Thursday, July 3rd, marks the second phase of our campaign: Muslim communities will visit or call their local bookstores and libraries to order books from the list, letting them know that their request is part of the National #RamadanReads Campaign. We want this to become an annual event, inshAllah, and for Ramadan to become known as the month in which Muslims flock to bookstores to support their storytellers.

    Muslims were once renowned as a community that loved, wrote and bought books, built libraries, and engaged in vigorous coffeehouse debates over the ideas that lie at the core of our humanity. At 8 million strong in the US, and with an estimated $170 billion in annual consumer purchasing power, we have the power to shape our own narratives. The key? Simple: The more Muslim storytellers we support with our dollars, the more diverse Muslim stories we will see.”
  7. So, I Wanna Clear This Up

    justinaireland:

    Because it’s a question I get quite a bit. And I know the people that write me the emails don’t mean for it to be offensive, but I kind of hate it and I hate having to address it:

    Zephyr Mourning, the main character in my book Promise of Shadows, is black. She ain’t white,…

  8. Some context on book challenges

    malindalo:

    The removal of The Miseducation of Cameron Post from a summer reading list may not seem like a big deal because, you know, it’s just a summer reading list. The book is still available out there — you can get it at libraries and now you can get free copies at Browseabout Books. But this is where book challenges happen now: in school reading lists. Let me show you a few links to recent book challenges:

    .

  9. medievalpoc:

    Medievalpoc: Fiction Week!

    Back by popular demand, starting this Monday (June 30), Medievalpoc will be showcasing works of Historical Fiction, Fantasy, Speculative Fiction and much, much more. Book reviews, thematic essays, discussions about representation in these genres, and resources for writers will all be included.

    Previous Fiction Week Posts

    Submit your favorite works of fiction here! Your original works of fiction are welcome, as well as links to stories hosted online, book reviews, thematic essays, or your favorite book covers featuring characters of color.

    (via medievalpoc)

  10. medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!
Half World by Hiromi Goto

Melanie Tamaki is human—but her parents aren’t. They are from Half World, a Limbo between our world and the afterlife, and her father is still there. When her mother disappears, Melanie must follow her to Half World—and neither of them may return alive. Imagine Coraline as filmed by the Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki (Howl’s Moving Castle), or Neil Gaiman collaborating with Charles de Lint. Half World is vivid, visceral, unforgettable, a combination of prose and images that will haunt you.

via Goodreads

    medievalpoc:

    Fiction Week!

    Half World by Hiromi Goto

    Melanie Tamaki is human—but her parents aren’t. They are from Half World, a Limbo between our world and the afterlife, and her father is still there. When her mother disappears, Melanie must follow her to Half World—and neither of them may return alive. Imagine Coraline as filmed by the Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki (Howl’s Moving Castle), or Neil Gaiman collaborating with Charles de Lint. Half World is vivid, visceral, unforgettable, a combination of prose and images that will haunt you.

    via Goodreads